eject

eject
verb
1)

the volcano ejected ash

Syn:
emit, spew out, discharge, give off, send out, belch, vent; expel, release, disgorge, spout, vomit, throw up
2)

the pilot had time to eject

Syn:
bail out, escape, get out
3)

they were ejected from the hall

Syn:
expel, throw out, turn out, cast out, remove, oust; evict, banish; informal kick out, boot out, chuck out, give someone the bum's rush
Ant:
admit
4)

he was ejected from his post

Syn:
dismiss, remove, discharge, oust, expel, ax, throw out, force out, drive out; informal sack, fire, send packing, boot out, kick out, chuck out, give someone their marching orders, show someone the door
Ant:
appoint
••
eject, dismiss, evict, expel, oust
Want to get rid of someone? You can eject him or her, which means to throw or cast out (he was ejected from the meeting room). If you hope the person never comes back, use expel, a verb that suggests driving someone out of a country, an organization, etc., for all time (to be expelled from school); it can also imply the use of voluntary force (to expel air from the lungs). If you exercise force or the power of law to get rid of someone or something, oust is the correct verb (ousted after less than two years in office). If as a property owner you are turning someone out of a house or a place of business, you'll want to evict the person (she was evicted for not paying the rent). Dismiss is by far the mildest of these terms, suggesting that you are rejecting or refusing to consider someone or something (to dismiss a legal case). It is also commonly used of loss of employment (dismissed from his job for excessive tardiness).

Thesaurus of popular words. 2014.

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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • eject — vb Eject, expel, oust, evict, dismiss mean to force or thrust something or someone out. Eject, although it is the comprehensive term of this group and is often interchangeable with any of the others, carries the strongest implication of throwing… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Eject — E*ject , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ejected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ejecting}.] [L. ejectus, p. p. of ejicere; e out + jacere to throw. See {Jet} a shooting forth.] 1. To expel; to dismiss; to cast forth; to thrust or drive out; to discharge; as, to eject a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • eject — /i jekt/ vt: dispossess Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. eject …   Law dictionary

  • eject — [ē jekt′, ijekt] vt. [< L ejectus, pp. of ejicere, to throw out < e , out (see EX 1) + jacere, to throw (see JET1)] 1. to throw out; cast out; expel; emit; discharge [the chimney ejects smoke] 2. to drive out; evict [to eject a heckler] …   English World dictionary

  • Eject — E ject, n. [See {Eject}, v. t.] (Philos.) An object that is a conscious or living object, and hence not a direct object, but an inferred object or act of a subject, not myself; a term invented by W. K. Clifford. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] || …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • eject — eject·ment; eject; …   English syllables

  • eject — i jekt vt to force out or expel from within <blood ejected from the heart (S. F. Mason)> ejec·tion jek shən n …   Medical dictionary

  • eject — mid 15c., from L. eiectus thrown out, pp. of eicere throw out, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + icere, comb. form of iacere to throw (see JET (Cf. jet) (v.)). Related: Ejected; ejecting …   Etymology dictionary

  • eject — (izg. idžèkt) m DEFINICIJA tehn. tipka za izbacivanje medija na audio i video uređajima (ili u računalnim programima) ETIMOLOGIJA engl. ← lat., v. ejektirati …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • eject — [v] throw or be thrown out banish, bounce*, bump, cast out, debar, disbar, discharge, disgorge, dislodge, dismiss, displace, dispossess, ditch, do away with*, drive off, dump*, eighty six*, ejaculate, eliminate, emit, eradicate, eruct, erupt,… …   New thesaurus

  • eject — ► VERB 1) force or throw out violently or suddenly. 2) (of a pilot) escape from an aircraft by means of an ejection seat. 3) compel (someone) to leave a place. DERIVATIVES ejection noun ejector noun. ORIGIN Latin eicere throw out , from jacere …   English terms dictionary

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